Learning and Teaching Linear Functions PD Materials

Developed under a grant from the National Science Foundation, these video-based mathematics professional development resources help teachers in grades 6-10 address some of the "problems of practice" associated with the issues and challenges of teaching linear functions. Based on videos of real classroom teaching, these materials better equip teachers to prepare and implement lessons that will help students develop conceptual understanding of linear functions. Teachers' own understanding of the subject will be deepened as they teach.

 

The facilitation package is made up of three components: a Facilitator's Guide, a CD of facilitation resources, and a participant's CD with video clips and resources. The professional development curriculum includes one foundation module consisting of eight three-hour sessions and four extension modules, each composed of two or three three-hour sessions. The five modules cover:

 

  • conceptualizing and representing linear relationships

  • launching a lesson or task

  • interpreting and responding to unexpected student methods

  • making use of student ideas during discussion

  • examining equivalence and generalization.

 

Each module is constructed as a series of interrelated cases, designed in a sequence that builds toward specific learning goals. Each case includes:

  • mathematics tasks

  • one or two short video clips from lessons filmed in real classrooms

  • discussion topics

  • readings

  • tasks designed as a bridge to teachers' practice.

 

Extensive support for the workshop leader is provided on the Facilitator's Resource CD. Resources for each session include:

  • facilitation notes

  • agendas

  • lesson graphs

  • video analyses

  • mathematics tasks analyses

  • PowerPoint slides

  • video transcripts.

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This work is supported with funding from the National Science Foundation (DRL-1720507). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed on this site are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the NSF.